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Why You Should Ask: Screening for Food Insecurity in the Medical Home

navarre jill shelley

Screening for Food Insecurity in the Medical Home is an effective way to begin to address social determinants of health. Partnerships with community agencies allow clinics to do a warm handoff of patients for additional assessment of needs and connection to available resources without burdening busy primary care clinics.


Charlotte Navarre, RN-BC is a Nurse Clinician and Faculty with the Providence Oregon Family Medicine Residency Program in Milwaukie, Oregon. She is a 1974 graduate of the University of Missouri, Kansas City/Research College of Nursing and is Board Certified in Psychiatric- Mental Health Nursing. Her teaching responsibilities include Social Determinants of Health, Health Literacy, and Public Health. She is clinical lead in the two Family Medicine training clinics for a number of local and national initiatives, including Screen and Intervene in Childhood Hunger, a 2 year demonstration project on screening for food insecurity at Well Child Checks. She is a member of the Childhood Hunger Coalition, a network of health care professionals, public health and anti-hunger advocates working together to educate the medical community, policy makers and the general public about the impacts of childhood food insecurity and hunger.

Jill Christensen MD MPH served 2 years as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Kenya working on water and sanitation and HIV/AIDS prevention projects after graduation from Amherst College. Upon return to the US, she worked for Oregon Research Institute studying youth tobacco prevention and adolescent physical activity. She then earned her MD and MPH from Oregon Health and Science University in 2010, then completed her residency in Family Medicine at the Providence Milwaukie Family Medicine Program.

Dr Christensen is now clinical faculty at the Providence Oregon Family Medicine residency working in the ambulatory care setting. Her academic focus is on social determinants of health and community medicine. She has been the physician champion for the Screen and Intervene pilot study for childhood food insecurity and the Community Teaching Kitchen. She is a member of the national Teaching Kitchen Collaborative. Additionally, she serves as medical director of the Providence Milwaukie Lactation Clinic.

Shelley Yoder, MSW is Program Manager of Community Engagement, and works in close alignment with clinicians and multiple sectors, across the Providence delivery network, to focus attention on social determinant factors that impact health care access and health status. A key component of her work is development and oversight of strategies, funded by Providence, aimed at bridging care gaps such as access to a medical home and attainment of basic needs (e.g. food, housing and transportation). Shelley works in collaboration with partners including federally qualified health centers, community based social service agencies, and affordable housing organizations to develop and implement strategies/services to address social and economic barriers impacting health status.

Previous to her position at Providence, Shelley worked for more than ten years at Mt. Hood Community College overseeing mental health and social services for their Head Start Program. She has her Master’s Degree in Social Work from Portland State University.